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I have recently discovered my place in life even though I'm only 15. I am not sure what the technical term for it is but I want to do something recording. although i want to do this in college it would not be good to go into it not knowing anything. and also i would like to know if that is really what i want. I am not sure how many people on here actually record  but I'm sure there are some. so if some people could give me somthing basics to learn or even tell how to go about doing some things.

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Any tech school that specializes in audio recording or engineering can start from scratch but it's good to have some idea. You might want to try and figure out what software you'd be most comfortable in using if you want to play in the digital age and maybe even check out some analogue gear for some outboard fun. Grab a few books and some free trial software and just start to mess with it. Like with everything it will definitely take time but could very fun in finding 'your style' which will come naturally. If you go to school you'll most likely be forced into Pro Tools which is a smart move if you plan on doing mixing production as a career. It's also a good idea to learn as much as you can on other digital-audio workstations. Some I'd recommend buying and experimenting with is a simple audio interface that comes with Pro Tools (will be Digidesign hardware since that's mandatory to use PT) or Cubase. Those two interface options give you a variety of choices as far as sample rate limitations and output options go. I'd recommend firewire if you have the option. Easy learning with minimal latency frustration. Grab a few magazine subscriptions that talk about production and engineering and see what appeals most in those fields. Who knows you might just fall in love with wiring up rigs or become simply fascinated with preamps and be the next Bill Putnam. I have a good friend that mixes and manages some talent in Wu Tang; he also just opened up his own production house and he's taught me some pretty solid mixing styles. If you are absolutely serious about it I can see if he has any pointers or suggestions for you. Shoot me a message.
I second Stephen's vote for Pro Tools if you want this to be a career path. I've seen some packages with Pro Tools LE, interface, mike and monitors for a very reasonable price. "Recording" and "EQ" magazines have lots of helpful information. But the most valuable asset of a recording engineer or producer is not a technique or piece of equipment, it's their ability to listen and really hear what is in the track, hear what the artist is trying to accomplish. "Big ears" come through experience and careful listening, and you can start on that right now!

I have a really good ear in music. like i play 90% of it by ear. is that helpful?

 

John Korchok said:

I second Stephen's vote for Pro Tools if you want this to be a career path. I've seen some packages with Pro Tools LE, interface, mike and monitors for a very reasonable price. "Recording" and "EQ" magazines have lots of helpful information. But the most valuable asset of a recording engineer or producer is not a technique or piece of equipment, it's their ability to listen and really hear what is in the track, hear what the artist is trying to accomplish. "Big ears" come through experience and careful listening, and you can start on that right now!
Is there any way I can get pro tools as a free trial. i looked and didn't find one. maybe i didn't look long enough.

Stephen Tammearu said:
Any tech school that specializes in audio recording or engineering can start from scratch but it's good to have some idea. You might want to try and figure out what software you'd be most comfortable in using if you want to play in the digital age and maybe even check out some analogue gear for some outboard fun. Grab a few books and some free trial software and just start to mess with it. Like with everything it will definitely take time but could very fun in finding 'your style' which will come naturally. If you go to school you'll most likely be forced into Pro Tools which is a smart move if you plan on doing mixing production as a career. It's also a good idea to learn as much as you can on other digital-audio workstations. Some I'd recommend buying and experimenting with is a simple audio interface that comes with Pro Tools (will be Digidesign hardware since that's mandatory to use PT) or Cubase. Those two interface options give you a variety of choices as far as sample rate limitations and output options go. I'd recommend firewire if you have the option. Easy learning with minimal latency frustration. Grab a few magazine subscriptions that talk about production and engineering and see what appeals most in those fields. Who knows you might just fall in love with wiring up rigs or become simply fascinated with preamps and be the next Bill Putnam. I have a good friend that mixes and manages some talent in Wu Tang; he also just opened up his own production house and he's taught me some pretty solid mixing styles. If you are absolutely serious about it I can see if he has any pointers or suggestions for you. Shoot me a message.
Not really :/ Digidesign keeps itself under mega tight wraps against piracy and such. So that's why the only way to use their software is by purchasing their hardware. Sometimes you can get away with finding illegal/free copies of plugins and RTAs and such but the repercussion is usually not worth the doe to just buy them. Your best bet is to get M-Audio's Pro Tools for a smaller price or just buy a hundred dollar interface that has the M-Powered version of Pro Tools free with it. It's a watered down version, however. Do not buy a USB to whatever converter to save extra cash. You could actually hurt your learning and ear growth with shoddy audio quality. Again, the few extra bucks are definitely worth shelling out for something that will be key in your future.

Aaron Limberger said:
Is there any way I can get pro tools as a free trial. i looked and didn't find one. maybe i didn't look long enough.

Stephen Tammearu said:
Any tech school that specializes in audio recording or engineering can start from scratch but it's good to have some idea. You might want to try and figure out what software you'd be most comfortable in using if you want to play in the digital age and maybe even check out some analogue gear for some outboard fun. Grab a few books and some free trial software and just start to mess with it. Like with everything it will definitely take time but could very fun in finding 'your style' which will come naturally. If you go to school you'll most likely be forced into Pro Tools which is a smart move if you plan on doing mixing production as a career. It's also a good idea to learn as much as you can on other digital-audio workstations. Some I'd recommend buying and experimenting with is a simple audio interface that comes with Pro Tools (will be Digidesign hardware since that's mandatory to use PT) or Cubase. Those two interface options give you a variety of choices as far as sample rate limitations and output options go. I'd recommend firewire if you have the option. Easy learning with minimal latency frustration. Grab a few magazine subscriptions that talk about production and engineering and see what appeals most in those fields. Who knows you might just fall in love with wiring up rigs or become simply fascinated with preamps and be the next Bill Putnam. I have a good friend that mixes and manages some talent in Wu Tang; he also just opened up his own production house and he's taught me some pretty solid mixing styles. If you are absolutely serious about it I can see if he has any pointers or suggestions for you. Shoot me a message.
Yes, that's definitely a good start.

Aaron Limberger said:

I have a really good ear in music. like i play 90% of it by ear. is that helpful?

 

John Korchok said:

I second Stephen's vote for Pro Tools if you want this to be a career path. I've seen some packages with Pro Tools LE, interface, mike and monitors for a very reasonable price. "Recording" and "EQ" magazines have lots of helpful information. But the most valuable asset of a recording engineer or producer is not a technique or piece of equipment, it's their ability to listen and really hear what is in the track, hear what the artist is trying to accomplish. "Big ears" come through experience and careful listening, and you can start on that right now!

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