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Hi friends.... As far my knowledge is concerned certain genres of music need humanising. I see humanising as the art of adding realism. The true flavor intended comes out only after humanizing. 

 

The humanising may be at the level of quantizing or at the level of incorporating noises. I see humanising wholely. 

 

Now getting to the question...

 

How successful a composer could be if he does not acquire the art of humanizing or is it even a subject of discussion as to the possibility of acquiring the art!!!???

 

Is it voluntary or involuntary???

Does it come by intution or calculation??

Is it worth training one self to acquire humanizing?????

 

Hope this serves as a fuel for a meaningful discussion!!!

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It's not really a black art or something , it's mostly using your ears and common sense.

One of the easiest ways for getting a more human feel is to play the parts yourself on the keyboard, afterwards you can quantize the parts were you really messed up and do some tweaking here and there but you already save yourself a lot of the work that you would have if you started with a purely programmed part.

 

There are also several clever kontakt scripts that already do a lot of work for you , for example the scripts included in LASS.

I also made a few logical presets in cubase that are doing things like adding small variations in velocity and note position. You can do this quite intelligently by for example only pushing notes back a bit within a certain random range ( to get some 'swing') or to start a bit before the beat etc, I made them quite subtle because certainly for fast passages I like the 'orchestra' to be tight enough and not be all over the place, this is a matter of taste though and also very dependent on the music itself.

 

All of this has to fit the particular instrument you are humanizing of course so you need to know its limitations and possibilities. Listening to live recordings a lot ( or seeing live performances ) is the only way to really get a feel for that.

 

So this all seems like a lot of work but in practice you can even get away with only humanizing a few important parts in detail ( solos , leading lines ) and just use a more general preset on the rest . If you have recent quality libraries a lot gets done for you behind the scenes already as well, this is one of the aspects that all the developers seem to be focusing on.

Along that same line I remember a quote by Billy Holiday. Simply put she couldn't imagine singing a song the same way twice! I have to admit I try to be some what formal in that I do sing it as close as possible the same way most every time. The biggest difference I notice is the feeling I put into it! thus the Humanizing effect? HOSS

Yes Mr. Jonas,

I am totally into it. Only knowledge base can widen the skills of humanising!!

Jonas Steur said:

It's not really a black art or something , it's mostly using your ears and common sense.

One of the easiest ways for getting a more human feel is to play the parts yourself on the keyboard, afterwards you can quantize the parts were you really messed up and do some tweaking here and there but you already save yourself a lot of the work that you would have if you started with a purely programmed part.

 

There are also several clever kontakt scripts that already do a lot of work for you , for example the scripts included in LASS.

I also made a few logical presets in cubase that are doing things like adding small variations in velocity and note position. You can do this quite intelligently by for example only pushing notes back a bit within a certain random range ( to get some 'swing') or to start a bit before the beat etc, I made them quite subtle because certainly for fast passages I like the 'orchestra' to be tight enough and not be all over the place, this is a matter of taste though and also very dependent on the music itself.

 

All of this has to fit the particular instrument you are humanizing of course so you need to know its limitations and possibilities. Listening to live recordings a lot ( or seeing live performances ) is the only way to really get a feel for that.

 

So this all seems like a lot of work but in practice you can even get away with only humanizing a few important parts in detail ( solos , leading lines ) and just use a more general preset on the rest . If you have recent quality libraries a lot gets done for you behind the scenes already as well, this is one of the aspects that all the developers seem to be focusing on.

Yes It is good to learn new things and yeah I am happy that I am quite going in the right direction...

 

I do sometimes wonder what mature music composers do... Do they rely on Spontaneous thoughts? Or do they plan their workflow??

How much does this type of plans work???

I am quite bewildered!!

You write a couple of parts, say a piano and a cello. You listen to it. You decide the piano part just doesn't flow the way you envisioned. You go back to the piano track and record 12 versions of you playing it via MIDI. You then play that back and decide which sections sound good, which sections flow well and produce the emotion you are going for. You can cut and paste the best sections together and then analyze how that sounds. You might try quantizing to various degrees. Once you've got a good performance for the piano, move on to playing and adjusting the cello part. Etc.

 

It's funny Fredrick. The piano samples I use have the option of including pedal sounds. I'm sorry but that's just too much realism for me!! 

All composers would benefit from playing keyboards and other instruments!

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