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It seems that in our modern time, interest in the fugal discipline is all but forgotten. With so few allusions to the topic on this board, I thought I might post one of my own examples of this rarest of endeavors:

Hallo Ray!

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Ah ha!

Hi Kris,

So, there is life on Europa!

A weighty, serious tome that I rather liked. My only beef is that the harpsichord gave equal weight to each voice which made what was undoubtedly some neat contrapuntal writing rather clouded, lacking definition and dynamical light and shade. 

I wonder if clarity could be achieved by perhaps assigning the top 2 voices to winds (or 2 solo strings) and having the harpsichord play a continuo/contrapuntal role/ (perhaps with a cello!) .  Just a thought because I don't really go for harpsichord solos too much and so my opinion is prejudiced, so please feel free to tell me to get lost.  I offer the suggestion because I'd really like to hear your counterpoint and at the moment I have to work hard to follow it.

Any chance of posting a score in the usual clefs....  :-)

Keep the flame alive....

Mike.

Kris,

      I really enjoyed the fugue section.  I'm beginning to think you're getting the hang of this form.  It would be nice to hear it with strings and maybe add more dynamics.  Harpsichord ranges from piano to as loud a mezzo piano if you really pound on the keys. Think you went places Bach only dreamed of.

I enjoyed this immensely. But why not use a piano or organ or any other sounding instrument than the harpsichord here.

Maybe it is just me. It has no dynamics while playing, if I'm not completely mistaken.

As Lawrence said, you are unique in your style of fugue-composition. I write fugues, but are an apprentice compared to this. I'm enjoyed with the ingenuity and fugal patterns.

So you are back, my friend? :)

Kristofer,
They know nothing! You are a craftsman of the highest standing.
I am in the process of fashioning paper and comb for my next performance.
Keep up the good work.

Ray

Mike,

As a matter of fact, I did indeed consider - briefly-  transcribing the fugue portion of this for strings, out of complete laziness, so that it might serve as the elusive third movement to my Octet, but quickly dismissed the adaptation as impractical. You see, I've now written two complete third movements and completely discarded both, and perhaps the passing notion was borne as much out of desperation as good discernment.

Around the last part of last year, I took on a project for the Adler Planetarium, which delayed completion of the Octet (and any other writings, categorically), but it also brought me back in the frequent company of some very proficient string player acquaintances in Chicago, and their good counsel and influence I think paid dividends in the realization of the second movement, not to mention, reignited my interest in writing for strings in general.

A string arrangement, in the future, when I'm more caught up with life's commitments? Yes, definitely. Will it enjoy any greater clarity over a keyboard rendition? I do not know.

Mike Hewer said:

Hi Kris,

So, there is life on Europa!

A weighty, serious tome that I rather liked. My only beef is that the harpsichord gave equal weight to each voice which made what was undoubtedly some neat contrapuntal writing rather clouded, lacking definition and dynamical light and shade. 

I wonder if clarity could be achieved by perhaps assigning the top 2 voices to winds (or 2 solo strings) and having the harpsichord play a continuo/contrapuntal role/ (perhaps with a cello!) .  Just a thought because I don't really go for harpsichord solos too much and so my opinion is prejudiced, so please feel free to tell me to get lost.  I offer the suggestion because I'd really like to hear your counterpoint and at the moment I have to work hard to follow it.

Any chance of posting a score in the usual clefs....  :-)

Keep the flame alive....

Mike.

Hi Lawrence - not to dismiss your points at all, but I think they're fairly addressed in my reply to Mike, so no sense repeating them. String arrangement would be nice, but a time consuming luxury which will have to be postponed for the moment.

Lawrence Aurich said:

Kris,

      I really enjoyed the fugue section.  I'm beginning to think you're getting the hang of this form.  It would be nice to hear it with strings and maybe add more dynamics.  Harpsichord ranges from piano to as loud a mezzo piano if you really pound on the keys. Think you went places Bach only dreamed of.

Per, ditto again. I've been back here for some time, at least a few months, however life's more pragmatic commitments seemingly don't condone my ambitions at writing music. I guess, I'll have to commit to the notion of a string arrangement, as it seems to be the consensus. Would be fun to post for comparison, perhaps in a few weeks.

Per-Erik Rosqvist said:

I enjoyed this immensely. But why not use a piano or organ or any other sounding instrument than the harpsichord here.

Maybe it is just me. It has no dynamics while playing, if I'm not completely mistaken.

As Lawrence said, you are unique in your style of fugue-composition. I write fugues, but are an apprentice compared to this. I'm enjoyed with the ingenuity and fugal patterns.

So you are back, my friend? :)

But now a kazoo arrangement? Alas, I don't know any professional kazoo players with whom to consult on the fine points and technique of said instrument's execution.

More importantly, the gender reassignments are growing apace.. I can't remember who is what anymore, like Allen beyond the looking glass. Manning (ironically named), Jenner, and now you.. Who's next? Serenity?

Ray said:

Kristofer,
They know nothing! You are a craftsman of the highest standing.
I am in the process of fashioning paper and comb for my next performance.
Keep up the good work.

Ray

I'm pretty sure you're being facetious, seeing that I've been accused of promulgating fugue fever / fugue-flu...

But despite my present addiction to fugues, I have to confess I had a hard time with this, due to (1) my ears being biased against harpsichords -- I find their timbre rather tiresome after a (short) while, and (2) most of the piece being (what sounds to me like) "16th note soup". There's just an endless stream of 16th notes impinging upon my ears, and after a while I can hear nothing else though I'm pretty sure there's plenty of other, juicier stuff in the mix.

And I'm pretty sure I'm ignorant / missing something obvious, but I had a hard time making the connection with the title. (But this is only a minor point.)

That all aside, though, I very much like the fact that this piece sounds very baroque in style and texture, yet with rather un-baroquesque harmonies. It's like something you'd expect to find in an alternate universe where the baroque era never ended and the classical era never began, while the harmonic language continued developing.

And now I'm eagerly awaiting David Lilly's upcoming fugue, having heard the astounding news recently that he has finally also succumbed to fugue fever. :-P

 I must also admit to having trouble separating the voices.. and the rhythm and density did seem quite constant.. If I'm not mistaken, even at the fugues subject 1st entrance, there was an accompanying voice.. I too liked some of the harmonic content, but felt the harmonic content wasn't leading its sense of structure, but more linear.. (which is fine, just takes a bit of getting used to)

I enjoyed listening Kristofer, but would love to take a look at it at the piano.  Can you post the score?  (and i would be able to give you a more detailed response).

Thanks for posting.

This is very worthy of Scarlatshtokovich.

I mean that in the most positive sense.

The Prelude was particularly enjoyable.

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