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This is the piece I have written and submitted for the 2017 National Young Composers Challenge, which I won during the 2016 year with my piece "Largo for Orchestra" (see that here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zBCpvi3-Azs). 

I see it as music that constantly tries to ascend, with little success. It builds itself up as though making a go for the heavens, trying to achieve the un-achievable. I gave it the generic title of "Fantasy for Orchestra" because of the lack of a consistent tonality (an aspect that I know longer consider indicative of my recent projects which are largely all rooted in a firm western style of tonality), and because of its sound of strong desire and emotion which could be described as "fantastical" in its hope and ambition. This music is not programmatic and these brief descriptions I have given are not meant to go beyond insignificant musings of the composer. 

It is based firmly in the ideas of intense spiritual emotion drawn out by unsuspected chromatic shifts in harmony, which I have adopted largely from late Mahler and Bruckner. While not totally representing my current style or tendencies (the music was largely conceived of months ago), I am very proud of this music and hope you will find enjoyment from it. 

The score is attached

The music:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kvCmnGuJI5U

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I took it as a somehow abstract theme allowing numerus permutations, and I liked both it and its permutations.

Obviously very Mahlerian in mood, it makes good reference to him. I am not a sympathizer with any form of spiritualism (emotional or otherwise), but it is fine if you choose to term your piece as such. I like the emotional bits (as opposed to the spiritual :-) ), but I found the (extended) orchestral forces well-handled and skilfully conveying your aims.

I expected it to go on a little further - it seemed like a very casual ending, but that's only one person's expectation.

Do more stuff like this!

thanks for sharing.

Thank you very much.  I appreciate the kind words.  The ending is a tad rushed, I'd agree, however I think it isn't rushed to the point of seeming improperly resolved.  My original ending is indeed quite longer but because of the time limit of 5 minutes for the contest, I kept it where it is at.  In the event that I win again and have it played by an orchestra, I will change the ending to the one I had in mind.  
Socrates Arvanitakis said:

I took it as a somehow abstract theme allowing numerus permutations, and I liked both it and its permutations.

Obviously very Mahlerian in mood, it makes good reference to him. I am not a sympathizer with any form of spiritualism (emotional or otherwise), but it is fine if you choose to term your piece as such. I like the emotional bits (as opposed to the spiritual :-) ), but I found the (extended) orchestral forces well-handled and skilfully conveying your aims.

I expected it to go on a little further - it seemed like a very casual ending, but that's only one person's expectation.

Do more stuff like this!

thanks for sharing.

Hi Daniel,
Big Bruckner and Mahler fan here too. Its not hard to see how tonality broke down in the early 20thC when you hear late romanticism is it?- Mahler especially pushing the boat out.
Obviously your piece is derivative, but it does show many encouraging signs as far as I can tell. The intensity of the expressionistic lines is very powerful and at times overwhelming. It might have been nice to throw it into relief with a more stable and subdued section, maybe a sort of 'trio', which as you know is very Mahlerian.
The scoring too shows some nice touches. I see you have learnt from Mahler regarding his spacing and so despite the deliberate pesante, the music comes across as clear and each line has enough room to breath- a valuable lesson.
From your post, I see you seem to have resorted to a more stable harmony for now, I wonder if you'll get to Mahlers 10 note chord in the 10 th symphony and wonder about where to go next......

I actually have many qualms with the popular narrative that Mahler, among others (Bruckner), was, knowingly or unknowingly, closing up the book that was Western tonality.  Mahler stayed true to tonality in his final works.  A few dissonant chords and hazy sections don't change that.  Anyway, I don't want to go to deep into this here.

I appreciate the kind words.  The music is quite emotionally overwhelming, which is sort of what I was going for given the short 5 minute time limit I was given for the contest.  There is indeed a brief intermission in the middle with the light descending violin theme.  It doesn't last for too long though, as the horns sweep the music back up into a frenzy.

Again, Mahler's cluster chord there in 10.1 is a liberty he took as a genius who had reached the end of his life.  After obeying certain rules and perfecting how they were obeyed for so long, he allows for a justified cluster of dissonances in his last work.  This is in no way some concession that tonality is done for, but rather a dramatic moment that stands as a sharp contrast to the heavenly music which surrounds it.  I'd argue the same for the dissonances in Bruckner 8 and 9, but I'd say he justified them in ways more related to the ethos of the catholic God and catholicism in general... again, here is not the place to argue my position on the late Romantics.  

Thanks again for the nice comments.  I appreciate the similarities you have pointed out between my work and that of my inspirations'.  Those similarities are good things for me to hear in my youth, while I still develop my style.

Mike Hewer said:

Hi Daniel,
Big Bruckner and Mahler fan here too. Its not hard to see how tonality broke down in the early 20thC when you hear late romanticism is it?- Mahler especially pushing the boat out.
Obviously your piece is derivative, but it does show many encouraging signs as far as I can tell. The intensity of the expressionistic lines is very powerful and at times overwhelming. It might have been nice to throw it into relief with a more stable and subdued section, maybe a sort of 'trio', which as you know is very Mahlerian.
The scoring too shows some nice touches. I see you have learnt from Mahler regarding his spacing and so despite the deliberate pesante, the music comes across as clear and each line has enough room to breath- a valuable lesson.
From your post, I see you seem to have resorted to a more stable harmony for now, I wonder if you'll get to Mahlers 10 note chord in the 10 th symphony and wonder about where to go next......

Hi Daniel,

Yeah, perhaps it is over egged that 10 note chord, but Mahler and your piece show how gravitating tonality was loosing its grip. However, Mahlers' chord, because of its timing in history marks it out as one of a few  portents for the 20thC. I feel.

I didn't realise you were on a time limit and as such I of course retract my suggestion of a trio. You did a really good job in those circumstances.

I am always intrigued to see where a young composer will head for, I still hear my influences in my serious work although I've managed to find my own way of doing things technically. I can say that you are far ahead of me when I was at your age and hope you will find your own path.

Keep posting here and join in....

I really enjoyed this piece, nice work in all aspects. Good luck when you submit this to the composition competition, however, I'd be concerned that such a competition is looking for a composer with an original/unique voice. Still you've got obvious composition skills. I'm especially impressed with the midi mockup, the sound is excellent!

Thanks for the comment!  I would say that, despite being inspired by Mahler and Bruckner, the music maintains an original and unique voice.  I say that because it only adopts certain aspects from certain movements of certain symphonies of Mahler and Bruckner.  So in that way, it is more of me taking a concept posited by them and expanding on it with my own artistic creativity and intention.  

I'm happy to let you Steve, and the rest reading this, know that the piece has been chosen as a finalist, and I will find out if I have actually won by the first week of June.  

Steve Chandler said:

I really enjoyed this piece, nice work in all aspects. Good luck when you submit this to the composition competition, however, I'd be concerned that such a competition is looking for a composer with an original/unique voice. Still you've got obvious composition skills. I'm especially impressed with the midi mockup, the sound is excellent!

I am happy to announce that the piece has won the 2017 National Young Composers Challenge in the orchestral division. The piece will be played this coming November by a live orchestra, and I will receive 1000$ as a reward.

I appreciate the comments on this thread, and would also like to thank all those on this forum who have to some degree influenced the composer I am today! Thanks guys. 

Congratulations Daniel, well done!

Keep up the good work.

Well done Daniel. If you get a recording, make sure you post it for us.

Congratulations--and continued success:)

Thanks Bob https://soundcloud.com/bob-morabito

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