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I always thought Beethoven waas a god, and from that period. Someone turned me onto a snippet of Stravinsky, spring rites, the sacraficial dance... well, good god, I'm glad I was sitting down, i was in noo way prepared for what was about to come...

 

seriously, that piece needs to carry a warning label or something, LMAO (wow...)

 

anyways, first thing was to go see who this cat was. A quick Wikipedia read betrayed that he worked at one point at a player piano place, and was involved in making the rolls... he would compose "for the player piano" and sometimes experiment and make scores that were unplayable by any human... youve only got ten fingers you know, and I guess you can whack a few "clusters" with a heel or something like great balls of fire guy did, maybe head butt the keyboard, but... theres limits.

 

He composed some pieces with "no regard" and freely used all 88 keys of the keybard.

 

Thay said he likd working there because it allowed him to make a player piano roll for his "spring rites" piece...

 

Sacrificial dance invoked an odd swirling, twisting sensation... i am tryng to grasp what it is I am hearing, but, I have a limited musical vocabulary as comared to most here. I think/guess what i am hearing is 2 classical pieces at once (kinda like you can do on a player piano?) and they are obviously out of time signature, to keep them somewhat separated... but, I cant shake the feeling that the 2 tunes playing at once are "really far apart" on the circle of fifths... and that each is moving around in a pattern.

 

I just cant figure out if one is clockwise and the other counter-clockwise (for lack of a better description) or whether both are moving in the same direction... and if maybe one is "faster" than the other in the same direction... they eventually grow closer and almost "meet" for that huge climax.

 

Now, I barely grasp tonal music, LMAO, and have my plate quite full, thank you, trynig to figure out what the heck I am doing... but, i cant shake the idea that somone else here couldnt use these fine computers to do something similar, if even in a mary had a little lamb fashion... as an, intellectual exercise.

 

I think everyone is so caught up trying to mnake sure everything is playable by human hands, and is transposed for the instruments, and making sheet music... that I know i cant, but, one of you "big guys" (and I hear the pieces, you know who you are, eh?) couldn't play with this. Forget about making it "human playable" and just make it sound good...

 

I cant juggle, but I do so enjoy watching a man swirling 3 chain saws over his head...

 

I played around trying to make a simple easy melody work in 2 wide keys, but, i cant mak it start to work... anyone here ever program in anything similar on the computer?

 

It would be like... a crossword puzzle. For one of you guys thats good at crosswords puzzles (judging my comparing my trax to others... i cant do crossword puzzles very good, lol)

 

I think Mr. Stravinsky was able to conceive of stuff like that, and that player piano rolls allowed him to experiment, using it like a primitive computer to play the results back for him...

 

I always sit and think "I have trouble with this... what would Beethoven have done with a computer and software?" LMAO... (probably written spring rites or similar a couple a hundred years ago, eh?)

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I see you really taking a liking to the Rite
Well you might like this podcast that goes really into detail about this wonderful piece
http://www.philharmonia.co.uk/thesoundexchange/projects/podcasts/no...
well yeah...

I think you knew the rite was going to blow me away, lol...

I have trouble getting my head around one tonal piece, lol...

I just meant that we all take tape recorders, and now computers, as a normal thing... beethoven had none of that, none of the old composers did. It freaks me out what they accomplished with ink and quill taken to parchment, lol.

How in the &^%$ did they hear stuff they were "working on" ??? i suppose they had musicians brought in to play stuff for them, help them work on it, was all i could ever figure...

stravinsky was i think using those player piano rolls like we use the computer... a machine to try out ideas on !!

it was his version of writing a score on a computer to hear it played back and work on the piece, I think...
These composers and all other composers from back then were able write the music they did with such complexity mainly due to their knowledge of the instruments, functional harmony, and their ability as musicians themselves. Most of the composers back then were pianist or at least played an instrument or conducted, Beethoven himself was a virtuoso on the piano himself and played in the courts.
On top of being musicians themselves, most of them had composition teachers and mentors or themselves taught. Back then, when you studied a subject, you immersed yourself in that subject until you knew it inside and out. Both Stravinsky and Beethoven knew the functional harmonic progressions and instrumentation of the orchestra that even if they didnt have an orchestra at hand 24/7 they knew in their head what it would sound like, or if then didnt, they knew how to play it on piano.


SEDstar said:
well yeah...

I think you knew the rite was going to blow me away, lol...

I have trouble getting my head around one tonal piece, lol...

I just meant that we all take tape recorders, and now computers, as a normal thing... beethoven had none of that, none of the old composers did. It freaks me out what they accomplished with ink and quill taken to parchment, lol.

How in the &^%$ did they hear stuff they were "working on" ??? i suppose they had musicians brought in to play stuff for them, help them work on it, was all i could ever figure...

stravinsky was i think using those player piano rolls like we use the computer... a machine to try out ideas on !!

it was his version of writing a score on a computer to hear it played back and work on the piece, I think...
SEDstar, check out Elliott Sharp's piece called K!L!AV! (KLAV with exclamation marks between the letters). An inspiration for it was the work of Conlon Nancarrow, who is worth checking out, too.
Okay... you guys are obviously not going to be happy until I no longer think of beethoven as my god, LMAO

Its heresy, I tell you, heresy lol... (but I will listen)
I listen to Stravinsky's Symphony of Psalms every week. It's mind-expanding. I'm hoping some of it rubs off on me... :)

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