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Hi all,

There's been a wealth of great music shared here the past week, so thank you to fellow composers for your contributions!  I've been sharing some of my chamber works, but wanted to share with you a contemporary orchestral soundtrack piece I wrote, called Dance of the Devilish Demons.  It was designed to accompany the closing credits of an action/thriller type film, although it was not scored with a specific picture in mind, but is rather a "speculative" composition.

Anyway, hope you will enjoy the more aggressive harmonies, driving rhythms, and orchestral colours.

Dance of the Devilish Demons by David Carovillano

Cheers!

Dave

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Very nice, I think this kind of orchestra is best interpreted when heard with visuals, it absolutely meets the purpose of a closing credits for an action/thriller movie or even for some scenes in the movie itself. Meeting the composing purposes is one of the major challenges when writing music, I think you meet purposes naturally in your pieces. Well done.

all the best,

Islam

As Islam says, this is very nice. But maybe too nice. I think devilish demons might just need lots of percussion to dirty it up a might.

@Islam, thank you for listening.  Glad you enjoyed it.

@Bob, thanks as well.  I should have mentioned that at the time I wrote it, I wanted to minimize the use of percussion because i had just read an article that suggested percussion is often a crutch used by media composers to enhance the drama of their music, and so naturally, I was inclined to see if I could create interest through the non percussive pallette, relying more on the strings for biting attacks.  Of course, some strategically placed percussion would further enhance it if the above consideraton wasn't factored in.

Cheers!

Dave

Hmmm. It wasn't what I expected. I was thinking more modern horror genre. That stuff can scare the living crap out of a person. Like Marilynn Manson types of stuff. Disclaimer I am not nor ever will I be a lover of his music. In fact, I find it repulsive and if music could be described as assaulting his music takes that prize. Here is an example of his music if you want to call it music- https://youtu.be/QUvVdTlA23w

What you have here is very sterile compared to that. 

David,

I get it. But there are many things involved in writing this kind of music that could be considered crutches. They are part of what defines this style of writing. So what. Too much reverb, too many driving string passages, too thick orchestration and more are all crutches. It's how you use them that matters.

I'm just suggesting that as good as this piece is, some tasteful driving and/or supporting percussion would have helped. I think it's part of the genre. I suspect that the article you read might have been down on film music in general. Over all, it's kind of frowned upon. No real substance. All show and no meaning. No depth.

I like film music. You don't have much time to get your point across. You need to make it happen now. In a symphony, you have all the time in the world to drag out what you are trying to do. And sometimes, you get lost in the process. Both take skill to do correctly.

Hi Timothy,

This is actually why I hate naming pieces.  Titles have a way of unduly influencing listeners more than I personally would like.  When you think of instrumental music, it's so completely open to being interpreted by each individual, drawing on their own sensibilities and experiences without the benefit of lyrics to guide them.  However, as soon as a title is added, much like a news headline, it's the first thing that's seen and has the greatest impact/influence even before a note is heard. That said, I'm happy to have my music be more sterile than Marilyn Manson and appreciate you taking the time to listen, whether or not you enjoyed it.


Cheers,
Dave

Timothy Smith said:

Hmmm. It wasn't what I expected. I was thinking more modern horror genre. That stuff can scare the living crap out of a person. Like Marilynn Manson types of stuff. Disclaimer I am not nor ever will I be a lover of his music. In fact, I find it repulsive and if music could be described as assaulting his music takes that prize. Here is an example of his music if you want to call it music- https://youtu.be/QUvVdTlA23w

What you have here is very sterile compared to that. 

Bob, I get it too.  You suggested the percussion would help, I told you why it wasn't included and that I agree that it could help, should I have chosen to include it.  You say, "so what" to the many clichés/crutches of film writing, and I agree with you.  I like film music too...heck, I derive more of my income from music licensing in film/media productions than I do with my concert works (as is common for anyone involved in both areas of composition).  That said, when I shared this piece with a network of music supervisors, I got a few comments back that suggested it was a refreshing change from the usual stuff they receive.  As for film music requiring skill...of course it does. Who said otherwise?

I do disagree with one point you made though:  the suggestion that having "all the time in the world to drag out what you are doing" with a symphony seems to imply that it's easier than the immediacy of getting your point across via shorter film music.  I don't believe this to be true.  Well-developed extended forms require so much more than simply dragging things along.  Indeed, considering how many people may easily come up with a tune/motif/theme and develop it in to a two or three minute piece, if one asked those people to develop a thirty plus minute work that effectively developed a primary and secondary theme (for example...of course there are many ways in which longer forms can evolve) they might struggle.  Just my point of view which you may disagree with, but I have written in both styles and these are my observations.

Thanks for your comments,

Dave

Bob Porter said:

David,

I get it. But there are many things involved in writing this kind of music that could be considered crutches. They are part of what defines this style of writing. So what. Too much reverb, too many driving string passages, too thick orchestration and more are all crutches. It's how you use them that matters.

I'm just suggesting that as good as this piece is, some tasteful driving and/or supporting percussion would have helped. I think it's part of the genre. I suspect that the article you read might have been down on film music in general. Over all, it's kind of frowned upon. No real substance. All show and no meaning. No depth.

I like film music. You don't have much time to get your point across. You need to make it happen now. In a symphony, you have all the time in the world to drag out what you are trying to do. And sometimes, you get lost in the process. Both take skill to do correctly.

Hey David. I thought it was well done. Sorry I didn't comment right away on the music as it stands on it's own. I guess I am predisposed to certain stereotypes and biases like everyone else. I wouldn't personally have named it that for the reason I suggested. This would have fit in something like the 70's Amytiville Horror as a closer. Just being totally honest in saying horror flicks have come a long way or maybe another way of putting is they have degraded a long way making it ideal for horror. 

This seems more ideally suited for something like a ballet to me.I can picture little costumed demons running around. Keep in mind, I don't think I necessarily have a true composers mindset either. The costumed demon idea also likely comes from the picture on the track which also prepared me in another way.

You must have had some idea where you could see it used?

Excellent, excellent. Film music as its best. Congrats to you.

Reminds me a little bit of Strauss´ Electra but no further associations. Actually I don't get any scene in my mind, I guess the music follows and enforces some story in a movie. I just listen to the brilliant instrumentation and transitions between all musical events.

Mighty!

Kjell

Hey Timothy,

I'm so far removed from pop culture that I'm not remotely going to suggest that this piece would work in a modern day horror.  I actually thought more along the lines of a psychological/political thriller, although that was only when shopping the music.  As I wrote it, I had no idea where it would fit, as I only write for the music's sake, and only try to figure out how to monetize it after the fact :)

70;s Amytiville sounds good to me.  Better 1970s than 1770s, a musical period I'm far more familiar with. lol  Maybe it could be part of a demonic Nutcracker.  I like costumed demons...maybe little Chucky dolls running around on stage.  haha

Thanks,

Dave

Timothy Smith said:

Hey David. I thought it was well done. Sorry I didn't comment right away on the music as it stands on it's own. I guess I am predisposed to certain stereotypes and biases like everyone else. I wouldn't personally have named it that for the reason I suggested. This would have fit in something like the 70's Amytiville Horror as a closer. Just being totally honest in saying horror flicks have come a long way or maybe another way of putting is they have degraded a long way making it ideal for horror. 

This seems more ideally suited for something like a ballet to me.I can picture little costumed demons running around. Keep in mind, I don't think I necessarily have a true composers mindset either. The costumed demon idea also likely comes from the picture on the track which also prepared me in another way.

You must have had some idea where you could see it used?

Kjell,

Honoured to hear such flattering words...thank you so much!  Interesting that it conjured images of Elektra...will have a listen at some point as I haven't listened to Strauss since my university days!

As I mentioned above to Timothy, I wrote it without any imagery in mind, and only to speak through the music.  Unfortunately, we need words and references to describe things, otherwise people won't take interest and listen.  Titling everything, "Piece 1 in D minor" won't cut it unfortunately :)

Thank you for listening and sharing your thoughts!

Dave

Kjell Prytz said:

Excellent, excellent. Film music as its best. Congrats to you.

Reminds me a little bit of Strauss´ Electra but no further associations. Actually I don't get any scene in my mind, I guess the music follows and enforces some story in a movie. I just listen to the brilliant instrumentation and transitions between all musical events.

Mighty!

Kjell

David,

I had to end my last post before I had a chance to properly finish my thoughts.

I think I would liken writing a symphony to writing a novel, and certain film score to writing poetry. One has and takes time to develop. The other must be more compressed. Both require skill. 

I would be interested in hearing something from you in this genre that uses more percussion.

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