Composers' Forum

Music Composers Unite!

Three movements, all pretty short (~4 minutes each).

Not as much saxophone and orchestra stuff which is a bit of a pity. Todd Nystrom played the sax part..I've always liked his lyrical style and tried to take advantage of that here.

Mov 1 : https://drive.google.com/file/d/1_aw5_GceVsy0K4ntaPR0da2s_hW7r7gK/v...

Mov 2: https://drive.google.com/file/d/1fGtRM5dI9eYdg7paF2cik0mvXUsemQkr/v...

Mov 3: https://drive.google.com/file/d/12neVbASo_2ANn5lRu_RdNp4debNgES64/v...

Some browsers don't seem to like Google drive, but I just can't bring myself to run my mixes trough the Soudcloud machinery.

Views: 77

Reply to This

Replies to This Discussion

Hi William,

I really liked this piece, all three movements. Haunting and expressive, and it's nice to hear sax being used in an orchestral setting. The sax playing is exquisite, and the orchestral parts (especially the strings) are lush and make a really nice foundation for it. 

Particular things I liked: the climax of Movement 2 -- from about 2:50 onward -- was really moving and a pleasure to listen to. I also like the somewhat ominous way (to my ears) that you ended the movement.  

A really enjoyable listen all the way through. 

Regards,

Rob

Thank you Rob, much appreciated. I agree with you on Todd's playing. He really did a beautiful job with a beautiful expressive tone. I should add it took him about an hour..I mean from when he got the music to a finished recording. The performance was spot on. I really didn't change a thing about it.

-William



Robert Caley said:

Hi William,

I really liked this piece, all three movements. Haunting and expressive, and it's nice to hear sax being used in an orchestral setting. The sax playing is exquisite, and the orchestral parts (especially the strings) are lush and make a really nice foundation for it. 

Particular things I liked: the climax of Movement 2 -- from about 2:50 onward -- was really moving and a pleasure to listen to. I also like the somewhat ominous way (to my ears) that you ended the movement.  

A really enjoyable listen all the way through. 

Regards,

Rob

Yes, my usual browser wouldn't play it. I'll try the dreaded IE later. It offered the download but I'd need your ok to do that.

Hi William,

Allow me to congratulate you with the concerto and not in the least with the fabulous performance of the sax player. The excellent recording and mix make it a complete success! The 3 parts have some solemnity and religious feel, like a kind of prayer in a rich musical context. I agree that part 2 has something extra in harmony and performance.

That brings us to the composition itself: It is quite an achievement. I especially like the way the sax interact with the orchestra, not just the solo against the ensemble, not just answering or opposing the theses, but really interacting and co-playing and shaping the total sound. That means that the orchestration is well thought through, equilibrated and builds some togetherness, cohesion with all the participants. And that's great!

The saxophone in the orchestra? I guess Ravel was one of the first to do so. It's such a rich and charmingly expressive instrument. Your composition is very welcome. Have you made a full score so that it can be played fully live?

(A brief word to the files: maybe you could use something like box.net to transmit the files; it never causes trouble and it is entirely free.)

Thanks for sharing your concerto with us,

Jos

By all means feel free to download it. They are wav files and as such a bit larger, but do sound much better than the smaller MP3s..

-William



Dane Aubrun said:

Yes, my usual browser wouldn't play it. I'll try the dreaded IE later. It offered the download but I'd need your ok to do that.

Hi William,

 So I might be misunderstanding here. Someone else played the high sax. Is this a live recording?

Thanks for sharing these. I liked how you had the climaxes or build ups come in at around the same times at the 2:20 to 2:50 marks or about 3/4 through the music on each one. The way the music comes back around after the build is skillfully done.

On the 2nd track, I especially like the low strings underpinning in support of the upper strings.

On the 3rd track, I love the energy present in this track. Far from mundane. The defining solo at 1:30 mesmerizes the listener.

On the whole these are all such great examples of sax as lead under mainly strings. Works very well and sounds very good!

Thank you Jos. Your nice feedback is much appreciated.

I do have a score for it since it was first notated, although would have to go back and include the small changes made during recording as well as a few more/less markings. Here is the opening movement as an example (in concert pitch):

William%20Maxwell-Concerto%20for%20Soprano%20Saxophone%20and%20Orch...

I did spend many years dealing with live orchestras and did have maybe a dozen performances of my tunes. There is a great thrill in that, but it is a schlog to get on the calendar unless you are a big draw. I never turn an opportunity down these days, although I don't go out of my way to make it happen either. Thank goodness for sampling..

Again, thank you for the very thoughtful response. I am glad that it worked for you. Probably the greatest killer of motivation is the "black hole" (ie it goes out without any idea if anyone even listened..), so your response is especially appreciated!

-William

Jos Wylin said:

Hi William,

Allow me to congratulate you with the concerto and not in the least with the fabulous performance of the sax player. The excellent recording and mix make it a complete success! The 3 parts have some solemnity and religious feel, like a kind of prayer in a rich musical context. I agree that part 2 has something extra in harmony and performance.

That brings us to the composition itself: It is quite an achievement. I especially like the way the sax interact with the orchestra, not just the solo against the ensemble, not just answering or opposing the theses, but really interacting and co-playing and shaping the total sound. That means that the orchestration is well thought through, equilibrated and builds some togetherness, cohesion with all the participants. And that's great!

The saxophone in the orchestra? I guess Ravel was one of the first to do so. It's such a rich and charmingly expressive instrument. Your composition is very welcome. Have you made a full score so that it can be played fully live?

(A brief word to the files: maybe you could use something like box.net to transmit the files; it never causes trouble and it is entirely free.)

Thanks for sharing your concerto with us,

Jos

Thank you Timothy. The sax player is "live" in that he played it in his studio using the score/part and a reference recording. The reminder was recorded via samples in my studio.

A teacher once pointed out "the golden point" and I have used it extensively since then. Shaping motifs, melodies, and whole songs within the ratio of 2:3 really helps, I have found, to give things a shape that just feels right. Purposefully not using the ratio can give some nice outcomes as well as in something that feels like it comes to great rest or leaves the listener in suspense.

Being a bass player in orchestras has maybe helped me discover the little things that seem to work in that part. The pedal tone is one of those. Glad you noticed it!

Thanks again. Your nice feedback is really appreciated.

-William

Timothy Smith said:

Hi William,

 So I might be misunderstanding here. Someone else played the high sax. Is this a live recording?

Thanks for sharing these. I liked how you had the climaxes or build ups come in at around the same times at the 2:20 to 2:50 marks or about 3/4 through the music on each one. The way the music comes back around after the build is skillfully done.

On the 2nd track, I especially like the low strings underpinning in support of the upper strings.

On the 3rd track, I love the energy present in this track. Far from mundane. The defining solo at 1:30 mesmerizes the listener.

On the whole these are all such great examples of sax as lead under mainly strings. Works very well and sounds very good!

Was the score written with Notion? The style looks familiar to me. It seems pretty much OK to work with, although conductors prefer grouped notations to minimize the full score.

Jos

William Maxwell said:

Thank you Jos. Your nice feedback is much appreciated.

I do have a score for it since it was first notated, although would have to go back and include the small changes made during recording as well as a few more/less markings. Here is the opening movement as an example (in concert pitch):

William%20Maxwell-Concerto%20for%20Soprano%20Saxophone%20and%20Orch...

I did spend many years dealing with live orchestras and did have maybe a dozen performances of my tunes. There is a great thrill in that, but it is a schlog to get on the calendar unless you are a big draw. I never turn an opportunity down these days, although I don't go out of my way to make it happen either. Thank goodness for sampling..

Again, thank you for the very thoughtful response. I am glad that it worked for you. Probably the greatest killer of motivation is the "black hole" (ie it goes out without any idea if anyone even listened..), so your response is especially appreciated!

-William

Jos Wylin said:

Hi William,

Allow me to congratulate you with the concerto and not in the least with the fabulous performance of the sax player. The excellent recording and mix make it a complete success! The 3 parts have some solemnity and religious feel, like a kind of prayer in a rich musical context. I agree that part 2 has something extra in harmony and performance.

That brings us to the composition itself: It is quite an achievement. I especially like the way the sax interact with the orchestra, not just the solo against the ensemble, not just answering or opposing the theses, but really interacting and co-playing and shaping the total sound. That means that the orchestration is well thought through, equilibrated and builds some togetherness, cohesion with all the participants. And that's great!

The saxophone in the orchestra? I guess Ravel was one of the first to do so. It's such a rich and charmingly expressive instrument. Your composition is very welcome. Have you made a full score so that it can be played fully live?

(A brief word to the files: maybe you could use something like box.net to transmit the files; it never causes trouble and it is entirely free.)

Thanks for sharing your concerto with us,

Jos


Sibelius.

The notation was really only intended for me/sax player to use to play the parts. I agree there would be a few things that would need to be done before I handed it over to a live group.

And thanks for the box.net idea. I will check that out.

-William


Jos Wylin said:

Was the score written with Notion? The style looks familiar to me. It seems pretty much OK to work with, although conductors prefer grouped notations to minimize the full score.

Jos

I listened to first movement up to now:

Masterly, a masterpiece. Great emotions expressed by both the composition and the soloist.

Congrats to you and Todd.

Kjell

Thank you Kjell. Much appreciated!

Kjell Prytz said:

I listened to first movement up to now:

Masterly, a masterpiece. Great emotions expressed by both the composition and the soloist.

Congrats to you and Todd.

Kjell

Reply to Discussion

RSS

Sign up info

Read before you sign up to find out what the requirements are!

Store

© 2020   Created by Gav Brown.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service