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Hello dear people,

I wanted to share with you my Intermezzo which is part of a Liederzyklus on poems by Hermann Hesse. The compositional technique of this composition stems from baroque fugal writing combined with the chromatic style of the late romantic to expressionist era. The sheet music is visual in the video. Thanks for your engagement and a happy new year!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xq2CgeINY6M

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Hello Jan Paul,

nice and interesting again! The piece seems to follow its concept with iron consequence. And again the tone seems to fit the attitude of Hesses poems very well.

Kind regards,

Jan

Thank you very much for your kind words! I greatly appreciate it. 

kind regards! 

Jan-Frederik Carl said:

Hello Jan Paul,

nice and interesting again! The piece seems to follow its concept with iron consequence. And again the tone seems to fit the attitude of Hesses poems very well.

Kind regards,

Jan

I find this both impressive and emotionally engaging.  I thought the slow, inexorable increase of tension in the middle part especially effective.

I'm not sure though if the quote makes for a good program note.  Its relevance to the piece might not be as clear to the.listener as to the composer, with the result that the listener will be distracted from the music itself by trying to figure out how the music relates to the quote. Or to put it another way, it's always a bad idea to try to explain one's art.

I took your criticism to heart and deleted the quote, I think you are right. Just like it has always bothered me that Mahlers first is subtitled "The Titan", which never made sense to me.
It's just that sometimes I feel like my conceptualization and thought process end up taking a lot more time than the actual composing itself thus making me feel like something might be missing with the philosophy left unexplained. Thank you for your opinion! 

Jon Corelis said:

I find this both impressive and emotionally engaging.  I thought the slow, inexorable increase of tension in the middle part especially effective.

I'm not sure though if the quote makes for a good program note.  Its relevance to the piece might not be as clear to the.listener as to the composer, with the result that the listener will be distracted from the music itself by trying to figure out how the music relates to the quote. Or to put it another way, it's always a bad idea to try to explain one's art.

Hi Jan Paul,

This is so evocative of Walter Piston's Passacaglia that I feel compelled to ask you if it was an influence on you -

Gav

Hi Gav,

I understand where you're coming from, but I haven't heard that piece before. Rather interesting.

Hindemiths single movement operas had a huge influence on this piece, as well as Berg (especially his Op.1 Sonata) and Schönbergs early work.

kind regards,

Jan

Gav Brown said:

Hi Jan Paul,

This is so evocative of Walter Piston's Passacaglia that I feel compelled to ask you if it was an influence on you -

Gav

Thanks Jan Paul, I found the piece effective -

Gav

Very nice piece. Well composed, the piano sounds excellent.

What does it mean "modern gesetztem"?

Kjell

Some original chord progressions make this an interesting piece, as I never could predict exactly where you might go next. So it held my attention, even though expressionism is generally not my cup of java. On the more critical side, I could have used more rhythmic contrast. But then, perhaps a certain starkness is what you were trying to capture. If so, I would say you succeeded.

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