Composers' Forum

Music Composers Unite!

Here is the final movement of a piece for chamber orchestra that I have posted the first two movements of earlier this year. I would appreciate any criticism or suggestions that anyone might have for this, and please let me know anything you don't like about it, that really helps.

Thank you for listening!

Here is a link to the Soundcloud page which has the other two movements of this work.

https://soundcloud.com/user-91321999

Views: 85

Attachments:

Reply to This

Replies to This Discussion

Hi Ingo, I really appreciate this particular style of yours, playing almost only one instrument at a time as call and answers. It is relaxing but at the same time demanding since many things happen and all details are parts forming the beautiful wholeness. At the same time it is narrative without addressing any particular story, it is up to the listener to evoke.

Each instrument has a special colour and character making the serial mix a colourful composition. It breathes creativity all through and that is lovely in itself.

/Kjell

It's a superb piece, Ingo. A fine example of through-composing with some reliance on motifs and superb ensemble writing.

As you know I had a preliminary look at the score and it's pretty clever, refined. I suppose a few more dynamic markings would help. Otherwise I've nothing to comment on (except the celeste at the very end...which prompts me to listen to the whole work in sequence). It paces along, the side drum at the opening gives it a military feel but that dissolves into a scherzo, sort of. The production is good, everything well balanced. A nice surprise with the brass (sub-)ensemble at Bar 65 and a really good, resounding tutti at 115.

I really like the way you sometimes write passages/phrases for groups of instruments, like that brass ensemble, adding in other instruments or combining sections as you move on. You're never short of timbral contrast! I can't guess how you achieved that brass sound but the articulations are so appropriate.

All in all it came over very well. Thank you for a chance to listen.

I may be back but not in a critical context. I'll find the first two movements.

.

Thank you Kjell for commenting.  You have a good way of describing this work, a 'serial mix' as opposed to serial composition which would probably get me into trouble if I attempted it. You make a good point though, that I'm not really making good use of one of the orchestra's greatest assets, namely a massed tonality made attractive by the composer's skill at orchestration. And the last work you posted did a good job of doing just that and it gives me something to work on.

Thanks again for your kind words.

Kjell Prytz said:

Hi Ingo, I really appreciate this particular style of yours, playing almost only one instrument at a time as call and answers. It is relaxing but at the same time demanding since many things happen and all details are parts forming the beautiful wholeness. At the same time it is narrative without addressing any particular story, it is up to the listener to evoke.

Each instrument has a special colour and character making the serial mix a colourful composition. It breathes creativity all through and that is lovely in itself.

/Kjell

Thank you Dane for your comments and help with a number of issues.  Trying to get the celesta to work properly in these three works with the endings especially is definitely a problem. I think I should revisit the second and third movements to try and blend both the sounds of the celesta and larger function it plays in the composition. I might try using some volume automation with the DAW to get a proper fade out at the end of movement three but movement two needs some surgery to get an effective blend.

I have posted a link to the completed work in the heading here as well as the scores but I certainly don't expect you to spend more time on this, you have already been very helpful and given me good guidance, thanks again.

Dane Aubrun said:

It's a superb piece, Ingo. A fine example of through-composing with some reliance on motifs and superb ensemble writing.

As you know I had a preliminary look at the score and it's pretty clever, refined. I suppose a few more dynamic markings would help. Otherwise I've nothing to comment on (except the celeste at the very end...which prompts me to listen to the whole work in sequence). It paces along, the side drum at the opening gives it a military feel but that dissolves into a scherzo, sort of. The production is good, everything well balanced. A nice surprise with the brass (sub-)ensemble at Bar 65 and a really good, resounding tutti at 115.

I really like the way you sometimes write passages/phrases for groups of instruments, like that brass ensemble, adding in other instruments or combining sections as you move on. You're never short of timbral contrast! I can't guess how you achieved that brass sound but the articulations are so appropriate.

All in all it came over very well. Thank you for a chance to listen.

I may be back but not in a critical context. I'll find the first two movements.

.

Now it starts to make sense. It opens with the celeste - as it also closes. The work as a whole hangs together well. The build up around the 4 minute mark in the first movement is great. The second movement has twilit colours about it, long shadows, warmth. The mix of solos and ensemble comes well. The contrasts in register/tessitura also come over well. Now I listen to it in context, the pause before the celeste enters could maybe do with shortening, like making it follow on directly after the horn solo - but these are just my feelings - removing the 2/4 bar 78 and cutting back bar 77 to just 2/4 so it arises out of the horn solo. However, always acknowledging it's your work you may be happier as it is. 

The second movement ends sleepily and the opening of the 3rd movement is 'wake up time'. a great contrast after that long G.

Again, I wonder if the celeste couldn't enter earlier without the bar's rest (117) in case an audience thought that magnificent build up and tutti to bar 116 isn't where the piece ends. In a live performance the performers would have to stay stock still after 116 to show it isn't the end, relaxing only a couple of bars into the celeste solo.

Altogether a most imaginative work and super ensemble writing. 

Thanks for posting the links. Passed some of the afternoon most agreeably!

I listened to the first movement, I think the ideas are nice, but the music could be enhanced by letting the other instruments participate more, it would add color, drama, depth to the piece.

Regards,

Thank you Dane for the encouragement and excellent suggestions. Your real world experience and composing skills are a great asset for us here at CF!  Celesta is a neat instrument but it's hard to write into an ensemble, for me at least. I will try your suggestions.

Dane Aubrun said:

Now it starts to make sense. It opens with the celeste - as it also closes. The work as a whole hangs together well. The build up around the 4 minute mark in the first movement is great. The second movement has twilit colours about it, long shadows, warmth. The mix of solos and ensemble comes well. The contrasts in register/tessitura also come over well. Now I listen to it in context, the pause before the celeste enters could maybe do with shortening, like making it follow on directly after the horn solo - but these are just my feelings - removing the 2/4 bar 78 and cutting back bar 77 to just 2/4 so it arises out of the horn solo. However, always acknowledging it's your work you may be happier as it is. 

The second movement ends sleepily and the opening of the 3rd movement is 'wake up time'. a great contrast after that long G.

Again, I wonder if the celeste couldn't enter earlier without the bar's rest (117) in case an audience thought that magnificent build up and tutti to bar 116 isn't where the piece ends. In a live performance the performers would have to stay stock still after 116 to show it isn't the end, relaxing only a couple of bars into the celeste solo.

Altogether a most imaginative work and super ensemble writing. 

Thanks for posting the links. Passed some of the afternoon most agreeably!

Thank you for commenting Saul.  You make an excellent point, the fuller textures of an orchestra are one of the best things about it.  The contrast between ppp solos and fff tuttis is very dramatic. That's why I have thin textures through much of the three movements of this work, so that when I use tuttis late in the third movement they are hopefully more dramatic.

Saul Gefen said:

I listened to the first movement, I think the ideas are nice, but the music could be enhanced by letting the other instruments participate more, it would add color, drama, depth to the piece.

Regards,

Reply to Discussion

RSS

Sign up info

Read before you sign up to find out what the requirements are!

Store

© 2021   Created by Gav Brown.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service