Composers' Forum

Music Composers Unite!

I will be the first one to say that J.S. Bach is my favorite overall composer, Partita No.2, Chaccone is my favorite piece, but what specifically makes his music great, influential, and worth all the recognition? How would you explain this to a musician and a nonmusician?

Views: 4075

Reply to This

Replies to This Discussion

Thanks Bob for your random thoughts, quite well thought out, I thought.

I agree with a lot of what you say, that's why I don’t object to the rest stroke (apoyando) in playing baroque pieces on the guitar. The thing is that I, like you, have enjoyed some bombastic performances of Vivaldi cello concertos for instance, the size of which orchestras involved, was not possible or available at the Ospedale della Pieta, where they were first performed.  The performances as such are quite musical, but it is intriguing to me whether Vivaldi would agree with that, having written this concertos with a much more precise sound in mind. In the end I had to buy the whole set of cello concerti grossi rendered by baroque orchestras of much smaller sizes. After the first (initial) estranging to what I was used to, I started enjoying them much more than the stuff I've heard before. Then, in visits to Venice, I've sought those performing groups out and enjoyed the whole experience much more in live performances. Matter of taste, I suppose, but today I would not go back, if I had a choice,  to renderings of Albinoni by Herbert von Karajan. I'd stick with specialist early music groups.

I think that a proper early violinist should take up the matter of technique that you raise, as far that instrument goes, but I agree again with you if you mean that lower bridges, gut strings, shorter bows, more frequent bow strokes resulting in less legato playing, and almost complete absence of vibrato are some of the characteristics of baroque violin technique.

For the guitar the situation is somehow different in as much as it does not need a lot of precise documentation of technique and anyhow its baroque usage and technique is quite well known to us through technical instruction books by great guitarist, lutenists and theorbo players of that era, like Ludovico Roncalli, Robert de Visee, Gaspar Sanz, etc.

There were not finger nails and no apoyando stroke in use in anything that I am aware of, until at least 1870, and here we are talking of an enormous body of repertoire, perhaps greater than that of keyboard instruments from Renaissance to romantic music, for Vihuela, guitar, lute, viola da mano, theorbo, etc .

Mr Arvanitakis, my vote will go for the guitar rendition. J W's

I found it more relaxed and suited to the piece.

I felt the violin was a bit 'forced' and I could not relate to that intepretation.

Granted, much music appeals to different moods and actually, times of the

day that you are listening to them. At least for me, this is true.

As to say,I wouldn't choose to listen to a Chopin Nocturne while having breakfast.  RS

As to say,I wouldn't choose to listen to a Chopin Nocturne while having breakfast.  RS

Roger,

Funny how we all perceive music, I would listen to Chopins' nocturnes at breakfast and be moved. I've also had to practice those pieces at 6am in the morning as a student at the RAM- perhaps that has something to do with it.

I've also listened to Night Fever by the Bee Gees in good health and Dvoraks' Slavonic Dances outside of a disco.

Hi Mike, the operative word for me there was choose

My point was more directed at enhancing the listening experience

as opposed to just hearing the music.

I also wouldn't wear a black Tux, even with brown shoes, to a disco.   : > /

 

I have been listening to the version by Smits. I don't know what the word "authentic" means but I would guess that her performance is exactly that. All I know is that for me it works. Thanks Soc, for uploading.

Image may contain: 1 person, text

:-) looks like a security door key to a troubled urban ghetto housing estate, or is it a dongle for Vienna Sound Library?  (either that or I miss it completely, Fred).

lol- if it is a dongle for VSL, I hope he's insured it. Looks more like one of those mini baroque drones he used to check his wife wasn't having an affair with Vivaldi.

fidget spinner.

These things have been selling out at all the 'stop and go' type marts.

They are a fad with the 8 to 14 yr. olds.

They sell for anywhere between $7.49 and $11.89 USD.

There are now many 'copycat' versions, even some w/ LEDS.

A silly contraption that has made millions within a few months.
 
Fredrick zinos said:

fidget spinner.

And many adults. I'll stick up for those who claim therapeutic effects, it's not a device/toy that can be so easily categorised as "8-14 yr old fad" though I suspect I am in scant company with this perspective. I have one of them there new-fangled fidget cubes; if baoding balls aren't a fad, neither are these.

roger stancill said:

These things have been selling out at all the 'stop and go' type marts.

They are a fad with the 8 to 14 yr. olds.

They sell for anywhere between $7.49 and $11.89 USD.

There are now many 'copycat' versions, even some w/ LEDS.

A silly contraption that has made millions within a few months.
 
Fredrick zinos said:

fidget spinner.

What is the difference between a fad and a trend?

Reply to Discussion

RSS

© 2017   Created by Chris Merritt.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service