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Hi,

This is SATB a capella version of 'My Mom's Prayer' with piano accompaniment.

Piano is for rehearsals and later orchestration.

I began to dream of something like 'symphony of Psalms'...

5 movements of prayers...  a goodnight prayer, a farewell prayer may be...

1st and 5th movement will be tonal/modal, 5th being 'My Mom's Prayer'..

2 and 4 mildly atonal with some tonal relations

3rd totally abstract...

1 and 5 will be performable as a seperate entity and may be 2-3-4 similarly...

Any comments will be appreciated.

Ali

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Very nice Ali!

Would you consider adding any more instruments to this? 

Hi Ali,

I'm confused by the role of the piano - you say this is SATB a capella, but then you also mention the possibility of future orchestration. Would the piano part be replaced by other instruments? Or dropped and the voices replaced by instruments? You see the reason for my confusion -- if the piano part is kept but replaced, then it's not really a capella is it?

I will say that the composer that kept coming to mind as I listened was Philip Glass, not Stravinsky - it is very static and minimalist. I won't offer any further commentary as this is an idiom I don't particularly relate to, but the harmonies were pleasing and the voice leading sounded skillfully done. Also: I assume you're referring to the hymn "A Mother's Prayer"? I'm having trouble recognizing it in this, but maybe that's just me.

Liz

Hi Timothy,

I intend to keep this as a background task.  Originally it was only a

single voice prayer.  Then a friend of mine requested me to write a

second voice...  Inevitably I had to write this a capella version.

Piano accompaniment is meant for rehearsals and a sketch for a

later orchestration.

I appreciate your interest,  Thanks a lot.

Ali
Timothy Smith said:

Very nice Ali!

Would you consider adding any more instruments to this? 


Hi Liz,

Thank you very much for your comments and critics...

Your time you have put in is so valuable for me...

As you may have witnesed somewhere choirs do the rehearsals with

piano accompaniment.

>Piano is for rehearsals and later orchestration.

As this is 

>A sketch towards 'Symphony of Prayers

the piano part serves as a predesign for orchestration also...

I remember Beethoven symphony sketches written as piano

sketches... if I am not mistaken...

The connection to Stravinsky is primarily his work 'Symphony of Psalms' not the

style generally.  Which work of Philip Glass are you remembering in relation to this one?

I would likely have a look at it gratefully.

Salva Regina has various versions.  I made direct quotations of phrases from them,

some but not all of them.  The idea of praying for Mom is universal of course...

Antique Anatolian cults are noteworthy...

I appreciate your time and effort.  Thanks again.

Ali


Liz Atems said:

Hi Ali,

I'm confused by the role of the piano - you say this is SATB a capella, but then you also mention the possibility of future orchestration. Would the piano part be replaced by other instruments? Or dropped and the voices replaced by instruments? You see the reason for my confusion -- if the piano part is kept but replaced, then it's not really a capella is it?

I will say that the composer that kept coming to mind as I listened was Philip Glass, not Stravinsky - it is very static and minimalist. I won't offer any further commentary as this is an idiom I don't particularly relate to, but the harmonies were pleasing and the voice leading sounded skillfully done. Also: I assume you're referring to the hymn "A Mother's Prayer"? I'm having trouble recognizing it in this, but maybe that's just me.

Liz

Hi Ali,

I wasn't really thinking of a specific Glass work, just the general static style. Maybe Glass isn't the best exemplar of the style I am thinking of, but he is the only composer who works in that style who is (somewhat) familiar to me.

So the hymn you used is Salve Regina not A Mother's Prayer? I'm even more confused now, sorry... if you could post a link to the original hymn it might help (not really important though).

Take care,

Liz

I'm always surprised by your work Ali, I put you in a category and then you come up with something else, you are very versatile! And you have obviously been working on your sound and production which is great here, so you wrote something smooth and mellow to take advantage of that, very enjoyable. I look forward to more prayers. Thanks for posting.

Good morning, Ali,

Well, it's a lovely work and I can sense how you see it potentially akin to a Symphony of Psalms. The harmony is mesmerising and sung in real life could be most expressive. It's modal but I'm unable to detect which mode. Is it a scale you invented?

As is sometimes good with your work I read from the score. As it's only 6 staves that's no problem on my small screen. The way you write, more by phrase than a fixed time signature is so reminiscent of Renaissance notation where, instead of using bar lines/time signatures, they'd place a comma above the top line to show the end of a phrase. You keep the tessitura fairly narrow that gives it an air of beautiful solemnity.

My only crit is that it's let down by the rendering. Is it possible to put an actual break between phrases (maybe by shortening the last note (of a phrase) followed by a rest)? And adding some light an shade with dynamics. It would mean copying this rendering just to come up with a more realistic sound.

Anyway, that's an 'aside'.

I look forward to the privilege of listening to more of the sections and seeing how it evolves as a complete work.

Sung by a choir in a suitable environment, this is beautiful.

Cheers for now,

Dane.

A great thank you for you, Timothy,

They say a good friend is  a good mirror.

The word 'versatile' is highly appreciated... I have heard this earlier

in various environments other than music...  May be it is an hormonal thing

which moves me in many diirections... could be too much dopamin.

Your precise comments are very welcome.

Ali



Ingo Lee said:

I'm always surprised by your work Ali, I put you in a category and then you come up with something else, you are very versatile! And you have obviously been working on your sound and production which is great here, so you wrote something smooth and mellow to take advantage of that, very enjoyable. I look forward to more prayers. Thanks for posting.

Hi Dane,

As always enlightening comments of yours...

You give a sense of real performance in every comment which I sometimes lack.

Your endeavor of trying to feel how it would sound in real performance is noteworthy.


The mode is Huseyni (re mi fa sol la si do re) probably the second church mode if I am not

mistaken.  The most popular makam of Turkish popular music.  A makam is different

from the series because it implies a pathway and semi-stop notes etc.

Thank you for making me see the rendering problem.  There has to be small point de orgue's,

done by playing with the hidden tempos...  I need to clean up also the slurs and the syllables etc...

Thanks a lot for the kind words.  Highly appreciated.

Ali


Dane Aubrun said:

Good morning, Ali,

Well, it's a lovely work and I can sense how you see it potentially akin to a Symphony of Psalms. The harmony is mesmerising and sung in real life could be most expressive. It's modal but I'm unable to detect which mode. Is it a scale you invented?

As is sometimes good with your work I read from the score. As it's only 6 staves that's no problem on my small screen. The way you write, more by phrase than a fixed time signature is so reminiscent of Renaissance notation where, instead of using bar lines/time signatures, they'd place a comma above the top line to show the end of a phrase. You keep the tessitura fairly narrow that gives it an air of beautiful solemnity.

My only crit is that it's let down by the rendering. Is it possible to put an actual break between phrases (maybe by shortening the last note (of a phrase) followed by a rest)? And adding some light an shade with dynamics. It would mean copying this rendering just to come up with a more realistic sound.

Anyway, that's an 'aside'.

I look forward to the privilege of listening to more of the sections and seeing how it evolves as a complete work.

Sung by a choir in a suitable environment, this is beautiful.

Cheers for now,

Dane.

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