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It was suggested that I post my new piece here as opposed to my blog. I had challenged myself to write a Fugue but I'm not entirely sure if I've done it properly. Any input?

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Simon mentioned that you would be the man to talk to regarding this Kris and he was certainly correct. Giving advice is not arrogant. I love all music and whether I have actually written a fugue here or not, I can certainly leave this as it stands and attempt it on my next piece. I can always change my title to "Not a Fugue, But Close". So I truly thank you for the wonderful advice you took the time to give. I may have to Google a couple of the terms :) but this is how we learn I suppose.
Hi Lori,

It sounds more like a Partita to me - or at least reminds me of a Bach Partita I played when I was a kid.

Well done!
Kris, The second I read your suggestion of Well Tempered Clavier I thought, that sounds familiar. Of course it does because I have Book ll. Mind you I haven't picked it up in 20 years so I dusted it off and took a crack at it. I played through the first 3 and recalled why I buried this book beneath the others. Difficult music that takes a lot of practice. I'm very glad that you mentioned it because it will help tremendously. And no, you did not give me the impression that my fugue is not a fugue. Besides, it doesn't matter to me if it isn't. I was the one that posed the question. I'm still quite pleased with the end result. I will attempt my next using the Bach book as a guide and if I were to follow anyone's advice on this subject, it would definitely be you. Your fugue for March's challenge is brilliant! Thank you for all of your help.
I suppose it could be a Partita Jack. The dictionary defines it as an instrumental piece composed of a series of variations, as a suite. The fact that it reminds you of a Bach Partita is good enough for me! Glad you like it. Thank you!
Thank you very much Jared. I took a peak at your page and I must say that I really enjoyed your piece titled Fall. Keep up the good work.
Are we talking about the same picardy third here?

what is your definition??
I would call it a picardy third only if it is in a cadential position, otherwise it is just a borrowed chord.

I might be wrong though..

I'm afraid the piece is not a fugue and nor is it contrapuntal. The piece is not entirely without merit but I implore anyone who wishes to write counterpoint to study,study, study.There is a craft of composition as well as an art.  As mentioned, Bach's 48 is as good a place to start as anywhere. Why not take one of his subjects and see if you can create a convincing countersubject to it and then go back and and see what he did.

 

I would have to disagree with both Josef and Michael. I do believe it is a fugue, it does not matter whether it is polyphonic or not. One can state a theme and then state that theme in another voice without continuing a polyphonic texture in the voice that first stated the theme. That is exactly what you do in fact. There's no rule that says you can't do that. To my understanding a fugue is anything that has this general structure: Exposition--Episode--Statement--Episode--Statement and so on until the Coda (sometimes preceded by a stretto). Yours certainly has this structure, so I believe it is a fugue. I personally like the two-voice polyphonic and homophonic texture that alternate between throughout. That is to me unconventional, and therefore interesting.

You have a beautiful theme and your progressions move along very nicely. I believe what could make it sounds more like a fugue is to write out a counter-subject that would come after the statement (theme). Right now what you have going on where a counter-subject would normally go is a I chord--V chord--I chord. Can you turn those chords into a counter theme of some kind that throughout would accompany the theme as it develops? Does that make sense? Wonderful job. I really like the way you come back to the home key you established with picardy third near the end of the piece. Very energizing. 

Not at all Ray, no need to apologise. I am honoured to be singled out for a special mention and I'm glad you found my statement so powerful.

However, I'm not quite sure of the point you are making. And what you mean by getting a life. Nor am I sure of what it is you think should be punishable by hanging.

Ray Kemp said:

Surely it must be a hanging offence?

Disembowelling probably a better solution. You all need to get a life.

 

Sorry Michael, I don't mean to single you out but your statement is so powerful.

 

Michael Tauben said:

I'm afraid the piece is not a fugue and nor is it contrapuntal.

 

 

The structure you describe is perhaps a Rondo. A fugue is, if nothing else, polyphonic and contrapuntal.

In this day and age, why set out to write a fugue in a harmonic language that is more common in the 18th C?

One good reason would be as an academic exercise, to gain a deeper understanding of the problems and solutions found in writing good counterpoint.

Another reason would be to gain more insight into the techniques and style of the great practitioners - Bach, for one.

 

If a poet states that he/she has written say, a triolet and then doesn't repeat the lines in the places that the form dictates, then, although it may be beautiful, evocative or profound, it isn't a triolet.

 

 

Jonathan Metz said:

I would have to disagree with both Josef and Michael. I do believe it is a fugue, it does not matter whether it is polyphonic or not. One can state a theme and then state that theme in another voice without continuing a polyphonic texture in the voice that first stated the theme. That is exactly what you do in fact. There's no rule that says you can't do that. To my understanding a fugue is anything that has this general structure: Exposition--Episode--Statement--Episode--Statement and so on until the Coda (sometimes preceded by a stretto). Yours certainly has this structure, so I believe it is a fugue. I personally like the two-voice polyphonic and homophonic texture that alternate between throughout. That is to me unconventional, and therefore interesting.

You have a beautiful theme and your progressions move along very nicely. I believe what could make it sounds more like a fugue is to write out a counter-subject that would come after the statement (theme). Right now what you have going on where a counter-subject would normally go is a I chord--V chord--I chord. Can you turn those chords into a counter theme of some kind that throughout would accompany the theme as it develops? Does that make sense? Wonderful job. I really like the way you come back to the home key you established with picardy third near the end of the piece. Very energizing. 

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