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WARNING : Ear Classification Rating - contains mild to strong dissonance and no tune you can hum. Not useable in a trailer context. Recommended ear strength - seasoned 20thC+ (and curious, adventurous ears).

Just joking, but you have been warned. A response to Bach from my point of view, here are 3 of a planned 12 (8 done so far). The Preludes generally obsess over a technical pianism and limited material whilst the fugues get their subject from something in their accompanying Prelude. The piano writing is virtuosic but not in a showy way and as the warning said, the harmony hovers between mild and strong dissonance with excursions into both territories.

Each pair is around 5mins long, so I hope some will find the time to listen and comment....(oh hell)

BTW, if you don't like them, have a go at HS and Gregorio for making me post them...it's all their fault... :-)

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and also am reminded of the "long note" theory elaborated on below.

Dave, this had me in stitches, mainly because I've been in similar situations,  just brilliant.

Or perhaps it's just a matter of me losing my taste buds from over-exposure to spicy food, and now I hardly taste spiciness at all. :-D Hmm, what does that say about tolerance to dissonance? :-D


HS,
All the more reason to keep a tight grip on the fantasy with a sure footed rigor- it is easy to loose your way otherwise.
I know about birds tolerance for spices as we live in the countryside and have an extended family of ducks, geese moorhens and pheasants......no food wasted here.

Well, this is all tongue-in-cheek, but I suppose it boils down to whether you consider yourself a connosieur of dissonance with refined and discerning tastebuds, or a bird incapable of hearing the difference. :-D

As a connosieur of spicy foods, I can say that even though I generally like spiciness, I also distinguish between different kinds of spiciness. Some spicy foods are merely spicy and nothing else -- eating them is just a matter of endurance as all those capsaicin molecules tickle your pain receptors. A lot of the do-or-dare types of "super-spicy" sauces pandered by certain specialist shops belong to this category - they are basically extracts of capsaicin processed to as high a concentration as they can get away with selling.  But other spicy foods are spicy "for a reason" -- they come with an exquisite aftertaste that makes you want to go back for more in spite of the fact your tongue is on fire and steam is rolling out of your ears.  These are the "real" types of spice that you find in actual cuisine, as opposed to what's essentially bottles of capsaicin concentrate that may or may not be categorizable as "food".

Hmph.  I've no idea how to apply this to dissonance, actually.  Perhaps the analogy ends here.  :-D

Listening to #5 in F, In the prelude i really enjoyed the gradual dissolving of tonic gravitational pull, (and then of course to return).. Some of the chord movement sounds a bit jazzy, then moves 'out' from there - .. Very evocative and atmospheric, and beautiful.

The fugue held my attention the whole way.. very gripping.. (some of the harmonic content reminded me of Bartok, whom i love..)  I'll have to  listen again, as there is much to pick up.. Listening to your take here has giving me impetus to see about a more extended tonality.

HS, actually you make a very good point, and a worthy one.

(a discernment that can be applied to any and all music)

I thought the analogy was 'spot on'.

Though some here may disagree, you do not have to be 'institutionally'

educated to have an ear for music. Nor do you have to be 'schooled'

in taste to appreciate good food.

I agree with Gregorio, that there is a 'jazz' element that permeates some of

Mike's work here, but the strength of the composition(s) speaks for itself and the

constructional integrity along with the conceptual 'flow' makes it palatable to even me,

an amatuer who simply likes good music. Talent shines it own light and needs no introduction.        RS


 
H. S. Teoh said:

Well, this is all tongue-in-cheek, but I suppose it boils down to whether you consider yourself a connosieur of dissonance with refined and discerning tastebuds, or a bird incapable of hearing the difference. :-D

As a connosieur of spicy foods, I can say that even though I generally like spiciness, I also distinguish between different kinds of spiciness. Some spicy foods are merely spicy and nothing else -- eating them is just a matter of endurance as all those capsaicin molecules tickle your pain receptors. A lot of the do-or-dare types of "super-spicy" sauces pandered by certain specialist shops belong to this category - they are basically extracts of capsaicin processed to as high a concentration as they can get away with selling.  But other spicy foods are spicy "for a reason" -- they come with an exquisite aftertaste that makes you want to go back for more in spite of the fact your tongue is on fire and steam is rolling out of your ears.  These are the "real" types of spice that you find in actual cuisine, as opposed to what's essentially bottles of capsaicin concentrate that may or may not be categorizable as "food".

Hmph.  I've no idea how to apply this to dissonance, actually.  Perhaps the analogy ends here.  :-D

@Gregorio
Nothing can give me more pleasure than inspiring a peer...thankyou.
@Roger
When I saw you had left a comment I thought, uh oh, first bad review. Well, what can I say, one or both of 2 things, I did something right and/ or, your ears are not closed. Either way a win win, thankyou.

Mike, when can we hear more of your set of preludes + fugues? (hint, hint, nudge, nudge) :-P

@HS,

You are a glutton for punishment, I am flattered though.

I'll update this thread in a while.

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